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Lab Safety, Avoid Exposure

日期:2022-09-25 07:11
浏览次数:50
摘要:Lab Safety, Avoid Exposure Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is clothing or equipment worn by individuals to protect them from health and safety hazards. In a laboratory setting, this can be safety glasses, gloves and lab coats, up to Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4) positive pressure suits. Fume hoods and biological safety cabinets  are two commonly used laboratory equipment that can significantly reduce the likelihood of exposure to hazardous chemicals or biological agents for additional prot.
Lab Safety, Avoid Exposure

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is clothing or equipment worn by individuals to protect them from health and safety hazards. In a laboratory setting, this can be safety glasses, gloves and lab coats, up to Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4) positive pressure suits. Fume hoods and biological safety cabinets  are two commonly used laboratory equipment that can significantly reduce the likelihood of exposure to hazardous chemicals or biological agents for additional protection.

Fume hoods are designed to remove chemical fumes and aerosols in laboratories. They use a fan to draw air through the front of the hood, then either exhaust or filter it from the lab (ducted fume hood) and send it back to the room (recirculation fume hood). The second function of a fume hood is to act as a physical barrier between chemical spills, runaway reactions, and fires.

Biosafety cabinets provide a clean working environment for the safe handling of biological contaminants and other potentially hazardous substances. They come in many different forms, depending on the type of seal required. Class I cabinets are similar in air flow to fume hoods, but the exhaust must be filtered with particulate air (HEPA) to protect the environment; Class II cabinets vary based on the amount of air recirculated within the cabinet, and depending on the nature of the materials used and Quantity to choose; Class III enclosure suitable for use with BSL-4, airtight enclosure with sealed viewing window.

Whether conducting chemical reactions in a fume hood or working with microorganisms contained in a biological safety cabinet, safe work practices should always be followed. We've reached out to the scientific community to give you three top tips for using these platforms.

Three Tips for Using a Fume Hood
Make sure your fume hood is calibrated and that it has a clear marking to indicate it is safe to use. The position of the sash is used to control the speed of air passing through the fume hood, and if the sash is too high, fumes can enter the laboratory. If you are not using a fume hood, close the sash so that it can be sealed in the event of a fire or.
Any large equipment inside the hood should be raised to allow air to flow under it and should not block slots or baffles. If you mark a line on the bench surface inside the hood, you can ensure that any equipment stays a minimum of six inches from the opening.
Do not use the hood to store laboratory chemicals or chemical waste. Items stored in fume hoods can interfere with air flow and introduce dangerous obstructions, creating potential health and safety risks. Different chemicals can also be incompatible with each other, causing unnecessary harm.
Three Important Tips for Using Biological Safety Cabinets
Make sure to choose the right cabinet for the hazard level; I use a BSL-2 cabinet when I use agents that may be related to human disease. I decontaminate it regularly, and the lab door it's in has limited access and biohazard warning signs. I always wear work clothes, gloves and safety glasses when I work.
You may spend a lot of time in a biosafety cabinet, for example, if you are plating batteries and treating them with compounds, make sure the cabinet is as ergonomic as possible. You need good knee/thigh clearance for proper posture (consider using footrests), height to move things in and out of the cabinet, wide forearm access for comfort (foam armrests might really help), and a nice large Work area to promote good aseptic technique.
Plan your work carefully so that all materials you need are sterilized and placed in a cabinet for experimentation before you start work; this prevents unnecessary movement of items in and out of the cabinet while you work, which could disrupt airflow. Never place items on ventilation grills and always sanitize work surfaces before and after use.